• Profile picture of plamenart
    • plamenart Yordanov
    • Chicago, USA
    • I share the idea of an art that creates new reality instead of offering its conventional model. I want to provoke the birth of view that goes beyond the boundary of reality itself. Viewpoints which stress an order that exists "a priory" in nature and can be developed again and again… Aspect that makes the work to exist as a signal, giving the onlooker a chance to go deep into his/her life experience and mind. Universal signals to which the individual responds in a unique manner and creates his/her own reality.

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    • opcabpol Ricardo
    • Porto, Portugal
    • I'm a portuguese artist with an interest in sound and light (in it's broader sense).

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    • Khalil Charif
    • Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    • All forms of artistic expression.

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    • Neno Belchev
    • Varna, Bulgaria
    • I am a multidisciplinary artist, who believes the most important thing being an artist is to have freedom of thinking. When I work, I try to understand the way, how we, the humans, perceive the world. How we interact with our surrounding environment. Based on this, my last works have been realized on way, representing the idea on many layers, arranged in multiple levels; from the shallow to the deepest, and which can be understood in many different ways.


    • Profile picture of Anna
    • Anna Gimein
    • Madrid / New York, Spain / US
    • dance, movement, the human body, the human mind

    • Profile picture of Maya/ Erik
    • Maya/ Erik Von der Nebel/ Kirton
    • Berlin, Germany
    • The Ouroboros Tales is an audiovisual collaboration between an american and a french artist both residing in Berlin, Germany: Erik Kirton (acoustics) Maya von der Nebel (visuals) Not to be restricted by genre, we incorporate different project names: "The Flood Ensemble" for neoclassical videos, "h2so4" for electronic tracks and "The Ouroboros Tales" for Industrial and experimental animations.

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    • Francesca Fini
    • Rome, Italy
    • I was taught that performance art is an experience and not a representation. In the performance, there is no interpretation, the performer does not "read". As said the italian actor Carmelo Bene, “I do not act, because acting is quoting someone else” (1994). There are no scripts and tests to do, to learn texts by heart, complex movements of the stage and steps to be stored. The performer himself is always here and now, has no excuse, he is not the healthy carrier of the thought of someone else (the author of the piece, the director, the character), but it is always 100% responsible for his actions on stage. The thought is his thought, and there are no scenes but "situations" that he created in order to live until the full consequences in the absolute unpredictability. Performance art is not a representation of reality, but then, again, a unique experience in itself. The risk (first of all the risk to fail) is always present. Performance art is therefore closest to shamanic ritual, not the theater of representation. That said, to understand my work I have to confess that I started out as a videoartist and the subject of my videos, even before doing live performances, was and still is the body in action. The body is always present, in its interaction with real or virtual objects and with other bodies. An art dealer asked me once to perform live one of my videos in an art gallery and I liked it so much that I started producing live performances along with videoart. For me, therefore, the videoperformance and the live performance have always been two distinct art forms, each characterized by its own language. And their meeting does not result in a simple mixture, but in the birth of new and different objects. It is only natural that the live performance and its video documentation are absolutely two different languages, because of the nature of the relationship of the viewer with these two products. This has led to mistrust and rejection by the purists of performance art to the video recording of a performance piece, because the core of this language should be its irreproducibility. The performance art makes sense in the form of a live experience that only happens in one place and for a time, only for those people present at the time. As we can sey, I was taught that performance art should never be “televized”. So how can I reconcile my love for pure performance art and my obsession for the video recording of the whole performing experience (and its subsequent circulation disconnected from time and space under which the experience happened), that for a videographer and doumentarist as I am is somehow crucial? We can say that my work stand out in this borderland between live performance and videoperformance as an independent art form, as I’m convinced that the recording of a performance can never give rise to a mere "documentation" that surrogates it devaluing its impact, but rather leads to a completely different object. In video recording we have a lot of limitations: the use of multiple cameras needs an editing and the editing manipulates the original timing and space of a performance art piece, the inability to return many elements such as the smell in the room, the energy and partecipation of the audience. On the other hand we have the possibility of intervene with visual effects, post-production, graphics and editing, adding multiple layers of meaning in a way that leads to the inevitable relocation of the performance art piece in the "augmented" space of the digital realm. My need is to tell a story that is the product of a personal, abrupt, incidental and unique irripetibile experience – the performance art - and “televize” it, making it freely available to everyone through the releasing of the creative video edition. Performance art, as well as my way to loose myself in a cathartic experience with unpredictable implications, allows me to express my loyalty to Life through genuineness. At the same time, the “digital box” in which the videoperformative version is immortalized, lets me be loyal to myself and to my unreserved love for sharing with the world.

    • Profile picture of J-F
    • J-F Vergel
    • New York, United States
    • Photographer, musician, writer, chef, son, brother, husband...

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    • Andrea Inocêncio
    • Coimbra, Portugal
    • My work has a social and political commitment context through a critical and ironic dialogue. It is based on an active participation, a continuous process of learning, research and of transdisciplinary creation both collective and individual. It reflects around geographical and cultural borders, limitations, barriers, behavior, etc. Questioning the limits of the body –as a border- social prejudice and the difficulties that it entails in human relationships. I also work around the figure of the woman artist, heroin and migrant in transit, social violence and the constant struggle to survive in a hostile environment. On how the female image became powerful within the erotic and the market as a reflection on how cultural identities are constructed through certain stereotypes and patterns of popular mythologies.

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    • David Anthony Sant
    • London, U.K.
    • Every film I create is an attempt to innovatively explore the visual language of the moving image. My approach to film making can best be described as Extemporaneous Film Making.

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    • Raoul Sentenat
    • New York, USA
    • PAINTING For the past Five years, I've been painting masks and faces. I'm very attracted to ceremonial, magico-religious objects, such as idols, effigies, and fetishes. What fascinates me is the visceral and spiritual power, the intensity that emanates from these objects. I like images that stop you in your tracks, that inspire fear, with menacing or ecstatic looks on their faces. In my paintings, I explore the relationship between the face and the mask. I am obsessed with the human face, which--along with the hands--is the most responsive and eloquent part of the human body. The face is the most individual aspect of a human being. What does the face or the mask reveal or conceal? The Poet Rilke said: "There's many people in the world, but there's still more faces, for each one of us has many." I love to observe the endless variety and diversity of human faces, what each one of us holds inside himself. I look for the unguarded moment in people's facial expressions, the contortions of the human mask, the mystery of another human being. When I paint, I know that I am going to paint a face, but I have not the slightest idea of the image that is becoming visible before my eyes. Chance is crucial to my work. The image undergoes a series of transformations until one image asserts itself above the others. Art for me is an act of discovery, and the challenge of finding the next step in my struggle to master the medium. PHOTOGRAPHY For the past twenty years, I've been photographing sections of the torn and weather beaten commercial posters that I find on walls and construction sites in downtown Manhattan. I take close-ups and extreme close-ups of these posters and take these details out of their original context, blowing them up, to create new works that I have printed in pigmented inks, on archival, one-hundred-percent cotton rag paper. "Sentenat scopes out the walls and construction fences of SoHo, the Bowery, and the East Village, like a rare bird watcher, looking for the perfect detail that exists amidst the street's messy vitality. The results look like nothing so much as carefully conceived graphic masterworks: out of a hastily painted building sign comes the subtle loops of Japanese calligraphy; seen from close view, a menswear ad looks like the work of conceptual artist John Baldessari." "Like so many New Yorkers before him, Sentenat has learned the art of finding beauty in unlikely places. 'Rusty garbage containers, graffiti, weathered and buckled posters--these things are inspirational,' he concludes." Andrea Codrington I. D. Magazine The International Design Magazine November, 1996

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    • Susanne Wiegner
    • Munich, Germany
    • I create 3d-Computeranimations dealing with literature and virtual space

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    • David Dunne
    • Dublin, Ireland
    • Video/ Installation , Sculpture / Collage/Assemblage There is a strange interdependence between thoughtless and evil. Hannah Arendt, A report on the Banality of Evil. My one significant area of artistic enquiry following the past 15 years has been issue surrounding Genocide and Holocaust histories. Investigating these issues has taken me to specific sites of Genocide throughout Eastern Europe and South East Asia.

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    • Pier Giorgio De Pinto
    • Bellinzona, Switzerland
    • Pier Giorgio De Pinto is a transdisciplinary artist, a performer, a curator, a theorist and a media trainer. De Pinto strongly uses new media as a “thinking medium” in which involves the audience, creating performative experiences and immersive environments. His projects usually involve others – musicians, choreographers and artists – from different cultural backgrounds, styles and identity genres. These collaborations enable De Pinto to undertake new and radical experimental projects, capable of stimulating discussion about stereotypes and prejudices, asking awkward questions in the areas of culture, politics and religion.

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    • chus dominguez
    • leon, spain
    • visual artist who uses video and film as tools and documentary as language. he works with elements coming directly from reality to develop artistic works between documentary, experimental film and poetry. regarding the audiovisual construction acts as a sort of architect who knows that the framework is the key element of its building. raising a point of view is like building a space, both tasks can end up defining a vision: those of us who get into the room cinema, see what the camera shows us, and therefore, we will and we will embody that person who sees these things. in this sense, the work of chus domínguez makes it clear performative process that makes certain that, in the screen, we build as a look such as a concrete subjectivity. as we see in the film becomes more or less accidental and accessory, and what is important is where he puts us who are in the cinema room.




    • Profile picture of Chris
    • Chris Veeneman
    • Paris, France
    • Painting on various surfaces and materials and combining them in an attempt to make meaningful art.